Thursday, October 13, 2011

Vivian Maier Photographer


So I'm looking through my American Photo magazine November/December issue and find this series of photographs by Vivian Maier. I could NOT believe my eyes. These are the most beautiful photographs I've ever seen. I read the article and found out that this woman had shot an estimated 100,000 photos from the early 1950s until the mid-1990s. She died in 2009 at the age of 83. No one had ever heard of her. She was a nanny for a wealthy family in New York City and a very private person.

According to the article, there is no evidence that she studied photography formally. Her work was discovered in 2007 by John Maloof, a self-described "third-generation flea-market seller." He found some of her photos in a commercial storage locker being auctioned. He paid $400 for a box of more than 30,000 negatives.

Check out her work at the Vivian Maier website.

5 comments:

Craig Edwards said...

She's amazing. Photography is such an incredible art form - almost a stealthy one - we look at pictures every day, but ones with as much talent behind them as these are rare. I hope that taking the photos fulfilled her as an artist, and that she had a happy life. Thanks for the post, Luana!

anthony stemke said...

These photographs are very interesting. What a treasure and nostalgic too. In the children's portrait it looks like the mid 1950's; I had a shirt like the boy on the left was wearing. They were called Polo shirts.

Name: Luana Krause said...

Craig: Photography is one of my passions. These are unique in that the artist was never recognized yet she created these amazing pictures. I find that as fascinating as her photographs.

Name: Luana Krause said...

Anthony: The image of the children really captured my heart and I just had to post it. I could look at it for hours. There is so much there...not just the beauty of the composition itself but the story it tells.

Name: Luana Krause said...

Another interesting thing about her early photographs is that she used this large unwieldy Brownie camera. It was obvious to her subjects that she was photographing them.